.

Stormwater Retention Basin Passed First Major Test, Says Mayor

Mayor Ted Bettencourt said the basin is a "key component" to the long-term plan to reduce flooding in Peabody.

Mayor Ted Bettencourt said these photos show the basin passed its first test. Photo credit: Mayor's Office.
Mayor Ted Bettencourt said these photos show the basin passed its first test. Photo credit: Mayor's Office.
Peabody Mayor Ted Bettencourt said the city's stormwater retention basin passed its first major test with last week's storm. 

About 3 inches of rain fell in Peabody between March 29 and 31, but unlike previous storms Peabody Square stayed dry.

Bettencourt said the manmade reservoir off Summit Street, which can hold 2.8 million gallons of stormwater, collected thousands of gallons of stormwater that normally would have flooded neighborhoods and Peabody Square. 

“The basin performed extremely well, which is very encouraging in terms of our efforts to reduce flooding,” said Bettencourt. “Not only did the basin capture water, which in the past has created significant problems for us, but it also drained very quickly and directed the water towards the proper channels.”

Bettencourt said the basin is a "key component" to the long-term plan to reduce flooding in Peabody. 

“This is an ongoing effort and part of an aggressive and targeted approach,” Bettencourt said. “The retention basin is a huge step forward, but certainly not the end all be all of flood mitigation. We will continue to consider these types of projects which take a very practical and localized approach to solving this issue once and for all.”

With more rain expected Monday night and Tuesday, the basin may get its second major test in a week. 

dianne hamilton April 07, 2014 at 03:42 PM
I live on Raymond Circle. There was still water in our basements - this was not a storm that we usually get tons of flooding anyway so I believe it was not a true test and success cannot be claimed yet. As we tried to explain at many meetings it is not the RAIN runoff that causes the issues it is the water table that causes the flooding - for a REAL test we will have to wait for all of the circumstances that cause the flooding to happen all at once. That is significant rain fall, full moon, high tide - when all of these happen at once that is when we will really know how well this worked. There were sump pumps running on Raymond Circle even with this small amount of rain.
susan April 08, 2014 at 09:54 AM
Dianne is right- I live on Sabino Farm Road and my sump pumps started pumping Sunday and didn't stop till Wednesday. I have ground water that rises when the water table is high and the ground just can't absorb any more water. I'm scared to death of what we will see if we ever get the rains that the Midwest has gotten. My pumps don't normally even come on with the 3 inches we got over the weekend. But, I appreciate the proactive measures being taken - I would like to see regular clearings of all culverts, including the ones down in my neighborhood.

Boards

More »
Got a question? Something on your mind? Talk to your community, directly.
Note Article
Just a short thought to get the word out quickly about anything in your neighborhood.
Share something with your neighbors.What's on your mind?What's on your mind?Make an announcement, speak your mind, or sell somethingPost something
See more »